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Chicago Camps

UX Camp Summer Home Edition

Saturday, June 5, 2021

Online — Everywhere — 10AM CT

Details

UX Camp: Home Edition is a 1-day mini-conference delivering design goodness to you, where ever you may be.

On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 10AM CT, from where ever you are—we’re serving up 2 awesome keynotes that bookend up to 12 (3 tracks) really great presentations!

Interested in getting on a virtual stage? Submit your talk idea!

Normally, we’d all be heading to downtown Chicago for some (hopefully) nice weather, great views, city sounds, and then the abundant food and snacks that we like to provide from the comfort of Columbia College Film Row.

Things are different now, and we want to do something that is great for our community, spreads to the broader community, and still provides opportunity for presenters to present and attendees to learn. We’re giving this a shot, and we hope you’ll give us a shot, too!

Meet Our Awesome Sponsors

Our sponsors are helping to make this event special and paying it forward by showing support for UX Camp: Home Edition.

We’re actively looking for sponsors for UX Camp: Home Edition. If you’re interested, or if you know someone we should talk to, please let us know!

Keynotes

Ashleigh Axios

Ashleigh Axios
Chief Experience Officer & Partner, Coforma

Ashleigh Axios is a speaker, strategic creative, and an advocate for design’s ability to break barriers and create positive social change. She is Chief Experience Officer and a Partner at Coforma, a digital consultancy and design firm that crafts creative solutions and builds technology products that support communities. She is also the Chair of the Board for AIGA, the professional association for design. Prior to her current roles, Axios formed and led the in-house creative agency at Automattic, served as the creative director and a digital strategist in the Obama White House, served as president of AIGA Washington D.C., and more.

For more, keep up with Ashleigh at ashleighaxios.com or on Twitter as @AshleighAxios.

With the World on Fire

Join Ashleigh Axios for an insightful and information-packed talk on the big and small lessons of a designer who works to make positive social change during times when the world seems to be perpetually set on fire. Learn about some of the biggest global issues of our day and the various ways creatives, and anyone with heart, can adapt their thinking and practices to help enable change.

Derek Featherstone

Derek Featherstone
Chief eXperience Officer, Level Access

Derek Featherstone is an internationally known speaker, practitioner, and authority on accessibility and inclusive design. He has been working on the web since 1999, when he left his career as a high school teacher to start his own web design company.

Derek is the Chief eXperience Officer at Level Access—focused on ensuring that accessibility and inclusion are an integral part of creating outstanding customer experiences. He teaches teams accessibility concepts and skills, and leads hands-on workshops with teams of all sizes. Working with Derek will help you analyze and improve your process, and incorporate accessibility and inclusive design processes into your UX and service design practice, and development methodologies.

For more, keep up with Derek at feather.ca or on Twitter as @feather.

How We Do the Work Matters

We&8217;ve told ourselves and each other for years that we should be happy with small victories—we worked with our teams to make the world a little more accessible. And yes, knowing that we made a difference is both motivating and professionally satisfying. But what happens when that isn&8217;t enough? How can we measure our work? How do we know we are getting better at practicing our craft? The answer lies in how we actually do the work, because how we do the work actually matters.

Schedule

Kick-off
Derek Featherstone
Opening Keynote: How We Do the Work Matters
Break
Adam Polansky
The Long Game: A New Mindset for UX Networking
Jess McPheron
Delivering On-Going Value: Creating a Dynamic Relationship Between Product Managers & Designers
N/A
Break
Amy Jiménez Márquez
How to Make the Right Design Portfolio to Land Your Next Job
Ana Peralta
Running Design Sprint Kickoff Meetings Remotely with a Global Team
N/A
Lunch
Kristen Lohman & Natalie Kurz
Conscious Uncoupling — Innovative Ways to Separate User Habits from User Needs
Jessi Shakarian
How The Evolution of Usability in Chess Can Influence User Experience Design Today
Lisa Dance
Stop Making Flawed Products
Break
Jason Cranford Teague
How to Talk to Your Developers About Accessibility
Justin Dauer
Humility: The Designer’s Most Essential Trait
N/A
Break
Ashleigh Axios
Closing Keynote: With the World on Fire
Closing Ceremonies

Speakers

Adam Polansky

Adam Polansky
Principal Experience Architect, Bottle Rocket

Adam Polansky is not a new face in the UX Community having been a regular fixture at events and meet-ups around the world for a long time. Even if you never heard of him, you won’t have to look far for someone who does and not because he’s published a seminal book about UX (he hasn’t) or because of a continuous presence on social media but because of his network.

His career has taken him from consulting for companies like the first real-time hotel booking site to Texas Instruments. He was the UX Director at Travelocity leading projects both public-facing and administrative projects. Today he is a Principal with Bottle Rocket, the first corporate app designer partnered with Apple and now setting the standard across Experience Design as part Ogilvy Experience.

Along the way, he’s done some modest publishing, taught UX graduate courses at Kent State, participated in the management and organization of several conferences, and for the last 10 years, working with speakers, especially new voices, preparing them and helping them get to the microphone themselves.

For more, keep up with Adam on Twitter as @AdamtheIA.

The Long Game: A New Mindset for UX Networking

“The long game is built on relationships.” — Russell Nohelty

There is strength in community. The careers within UX all require a degree of empathy which requires patience and care. It’s for this reason, a strong personal network doesn’t take shape overnight. It’s a long game and in 2021, there are new dynamics to consider both where you work and across the industry internationally.

During this visit, you’ll learn some different ways to think about networking. NOT in terms of what you’ll get from it but instead, what you put into it Find out what deliberate presence, kindness, and generosity as a foundation for building relationships will do what you can’t by collecting connections in LinkedIn.

This session won’t all be about theory or philosophy either. We’ll cover very specific do’s and don’ts and insights unique to UX that will more closely align you with others in the field. Whether you’re fresh out of school, transitioning-in from a different career, or you just want to extend yourself into the broader UX community, you will take away something you can use tomorrow to build a strong and fruitful matrix of interrelated people that will endure for decades… if you look after it.

The short game may earn some reward. The long game, if you play it well, is its own reward and it won’t be what you think.

…it’ll be even better.

Amy Jiménez Márquez

Amy Jiménez Márquez
Design Director, Compass

Amy Jiménez Márquez is the owner and Publisher of Boxes and Arrows, devoted to the practice, innovation, and discussion of design—including graphic design, interaction design, information architecture, and the design of business.

She is also the UX Design Manager for Alexa Adaptive Personality Experience at Amazon. With a Master’s degree in Directing, Amy has been performing improvisational comedy for over 20 years, and enjoys applying improv collaboration techniques to her daily work. She has been leading cross-disciplinary design teams for the past 5+ years, including information architects, conversational designers, UX designers, UX researchers, and VUI designers.

For more, keep up with Amy at amymarquez.com or on Twitter as @amymarquez.

How to Make the Right Design Portfolio to Land Your Next Job

As a hiring manager at Amazon, I’ve seen a gazillion resumes and portfolios. I&8217;ve also been part of review panels for portfolio presentations from intern level to management roles. I’ve seen the patterns in what works, what doesn’t work, and what sets a candidate apart from the rest. In this talk, I’ll walk you through what you need to make a solid portfolio, no matter how much of your design work you’re allowed to show.

If you’ve ever applied for a design job, you’ve probably had to make a portfolio. From all levels—entry to senior leadership—hiring managers are asking to see portfolios. What if you have nothing you’re allowed to show because of IP restrictions? What if you’re a voice designer or information architect? Or, heaven forbid, a design manager being asked to present a portfolio? Relax, I can tell you exactly what you need to do.

Ana Peralta

Ana Peralta
Senior User Experience & Product Designer, Dell Technologies

Ana V Peralta is a User Experience Designer, CSPO and User Experience Strategist based in Austin, Texas. Ana is known for her work with the Dell IT Support site, Facebook’s Transparency reports and Disney’s Corporate Retreat e-brochure website where you can build magical itineraries with your colleagues. After receiving her Undergraduate degree in International Business with Honors from Florida International University, she didn’t discover her cause and purpose until entering the workforce in the Technology sector. She now specializes in applying Design Thinking to develop website, web applications, mobile applications, and product roadmaps to set them up for customer engagement and usability success. Her favorite part about her career is the flexibility, work-life balance and ability to take on projects of her choosing in her free time.

Her recent focus stems from the early days in her career when she noticed how undiverse all office settings she was hired in were amongst other challenges faced by women in man-dominated spaces—she felt like a unicorn for being there while also feeling out of place after having earned her place. Ana now seeks alliances with organizations that are assisting with this disparity in STEM within minority communities from girls as young as 10 to women with seasoned careers. When she’s not working, you can catch Ana traveling to different countries around the world, taking photographs of her surroundings, eating pizza and being active in Austin’s outdoor scenery.

Running Design Sprint Kickoff Meetings Remotely with a Global Team

Do you work distributed/remotely? Does anyone on your team work distributed/remotely? Now, is your team spread out across different countries, continents and time zones? Welcome to my (career) life! In this talk, I will share tools, resources, methods and epic fail stories of ways I’ve attempted to run kick off design sprint meetings with multidisciplinary teams and how I manage to organize my work day in order to get it all done.

With a set of prep work of templated documentation, team exercises and distribution of roles done in advance coupled with remote screen-sharing tools, anyone will able to keep the engagement, participation and morale levels high and efficient in their workshop running as if you were in all back in a meeting room.

Jason Cranford Teague

Jason Cranford Teague
UX Lead, Rivet Logic

Jason is a creative strategist, writer, and speaker who has written numerous books and articles about digital design and creative development. His books include the best selling CSS Visual Quickstart Guide and Final Cut Pro and the Art of Filmmaking. He is a regular speaker at leading conferences including SXSW, WebVisions, and The Internet Summit and teaches classes in experience design at Drexel University.

As an internet industry leader for over twenty years, Jason has worked with clients like Virgin Group, The Aspen Institute, The XPrize Foundation, The EPA, Capital One, and Marriott International to find innovative solutions for their experience design products. Jason is currently the UX Lead at Rivet Logic.

For more, keep up with Jason at jason.cranfordteague.com.

How to Talk to Your Developers About Accessibility

Although generally thought of as something only important to the “disabled”, considering accessibility for digital products improves everyones experience. This is true regardless of their particular abilities. Instead of treating accessibility as a checklist or afterthought, it’s important to build it into every decision being made in a technology project. Like many requirements that are commonly thought of as something included for a niche audience, accessibility is something that not only addresses the needs of the deaf or blind, it broadens the scope of how well all users interact with your product.

Accessibility is far more than just accommodating to a small audience of users with “special needs”. At its core, accessibility is about making sure that as wide an audience as possible can use the products you have worked so hard to create.

Although by no means the only myths that have built up around the limitations of making digital products accessible, these seven crop up most regularly. In this session, Jason will examine each myth individually, expose why they are not true, and talk about how to dispel them.

  1. Myth: Accessibility only helps the “disabled”
  2. Myth: Accessibility is just about the visual and auditory
  3. Myth: If we are 508 Compliant, we are accessible
  4. Myth: Accessibility compliance is a checklist
  5. Myth: Accessibility is the designer’s job
  6. Myth: Accessibility takes too much time & costs more
  7. Myth: Making a product accessible limits design possibilities
Jess McPheron

Jess McPheron
Senior Product Manager, Vibes

A tinkerer at heart, Jess McPheron is an ideating and problem-solving enthusiast. Curiosity and a passion for creating led him into the world of product management seven years ago when building his own ecommerce concept. This period of curiosity led to a career in product management for both early stage and high-growth startups.

Having worked in research to inform the development of turnkey protein products, one of which won the NuW Excellence Award, Jess established a strong foundation of leveraging industry and competitive research to form educated opinions. Since then, he’s spent time in SaaS environments, mainly focused on innovating and iterating new products.

Given the background in research and product development for both consumer packaged goods and software, Jess has formed a unique perspective about how teams should operate and products should be built. He has learned the importance of combining various research and feedback inputs with a cohesive team dynamic to ship quicker while still providing value—and what happens when you don’t.

Delivering On-Going Value: Creating a Dynamic Relationship Between Product Managers & Designers

Regardless if you’re building a net new product from the ground up or iterating something that is a little more established, there are two critical inputs that often get overlooked by product managers; customer feedback and establishing healthy collaboration with the design team.

Neglecting these inputs can have two different areas of impact. On one hand, you are building blind based on instinct which will march the team in circles. On the other hand, you are siloing functions that are critical to success, and treating design more like a service. If you ignore the two simultaneously, you’re likely to have a fractured product team that lacks vision, and buy-in amongst the team.

This talk will cover why you should talk to your customers throughout various stages of the product life cycle, what questions to ask when, why the inputs are sometimes ignored and when that’s okay. We will talk about the fluid relationship between the two inputs, who should lead what, and how prioritizing even the smallest wins can keep you marching towards your North Star. Combining these will keep the team organized, aligned, and energized, leading to a more inclusive & energized product team.

Jessi Shakarian

Jessi Shakarian
UX Designer & Accessibility Lead, DIA Design

Jessi Shakarian got her start in tech as a developer, but found that she loved everything that happens before it’s time to code. She works as a freelance UX and accessibility consultant, and is currently the accessibility lead at DIA Design Guild. Jessi is currently writing a book about accessibility and games.

When she’s not working, she enjoys cooking, catching up on the newest Marvel event, and hanging out with her cats, Lucy and Ollie.

For more, keep up with Jessi at jessishakarian.notion.site or on Twitter as @JessiShakarian.

How The Evolution of Usability in Chess Can Influence User Experience Design Today

​What does an old game like chess have to do with user experience? It’s a great example of long standing user experience and design—it transcends time and languages, and moved across empires. A player in the 1600s would be able to play the same we play today. In this post-Queen’s Gambit world, chess is even more popular than ever online, in part due to the pandemic.

UX continues to evolve as technology quickly develops, but there are still mental models that users expect online. Similar to chess—we all know what the pieces look like, the ways the pieces move, but how a player gets to their goal is up to an individual player. We’ll examine the history of this great game and explore the many attempts to modify and customize the game over centuries as popularity grew, but there is always a return to its original form—and what user experience designers can learn from this and apply to our work today.

Justin Dauer

Justin Dauer
Vice President of Design, bswift

Justin is a multi-faceted, multi-pierced, multi-tattooed designer, author, and speaker. He wrote the celebrated book “Creative Culture,” speaks internationally on culture and design, and is the Vice President of Design at bswift, a CVS Health company. With Josef Müller-Brockmann and user advocacy claiming equal parts of his creative heart since graduating The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, he’s immersed himself in tangible and digital media over the past 20 years.

As a perpetual student of design, observation, and creative process, Justin builds teams and cultivates cultures around the perspectives and skill sets we already use daily in our work: empathy, objectivity, and creativity.

For more, keep up with Justin at pseudoroom.com or on Twitter as @pseudoroom.

Humility: The Designer’s Most Essential Trait

Humility is essential to doing our best work. Why? Effective visual communication and intuitive UX are not subjective; every objective design decision we make carries weight, and is bigger than us. We must understand the privilege, and the responsibility, that are inherent in our craft.

And, in communicating. In connecting with people through design.

When there are clear project goals to be reached and problems to be solved, having a willingness to listen, learn, understand, grow, evolve, and connect will fuel you–and your design’s–evolution.

If we are always students of our craft, we are always making ourselves available to evolve. “Experience” does not equal “expert”, despite having a monogrammed portfolio or a blue checkbox next to your Twitter handle.

Through the lens of vulnerability of a career’s journey inclusive of early success, and the resulting effects on his design and personal growth, join Justin Dauer as he talks through how the human connection must always lead in evolving ourselves as designers, our work, and our career’s journey. We can’t settle for anything less: you, your work, and those on the receiving end of what you create, deserve nothing less.

Kristen Lohman

Kristen Lohman
Lead User Experience Designer, Flexion

Kristen Lohman transitioned from technical writing to UX design in 2014, when she was tasked with redesigning an antiquated loan origination and servicing system at OneMain Financial. Since then, she has championed user-centered design techniques and worked to incorporate UX methodologies into an agile framework, designing data-driven e-commerce sites for B2B businesses, leading a redesign initiative to improve usability for a product information management (PIM) platform used by over 60K users, and most currently leading UX research and design for Flexion’s United States Tax Court Case Management System project, which has earned accolades for its ease of use in pre-launch testing.

For more, keep up with Kristen at kristenarielart.com.

Natalie Kurz

Natalie Kurz
Director of User Experience, Flexion

Natalie Kurz has spent the last 20 years helping elevate digital experiences from the ordinary to the extraordinary. Her unique skill set bridges the gap between strategy and execution, manager and designer, analytical and creative thinker. She’s led a wide breadth of projects for a slew of industries, most notably working on applications, mobile experiences, and product development for the healthcare, tourism, government, financial, and nonprofit sectors.

Most recently she’s been dedicated to civic tech, spending 3.5 years as an innovation fellow at the CFPB and currently leading projects for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, GSA, Centers for Disease Control, and the U.S. Tax Court as the Director of UX at Flexion Inc. She’s previously presented on UX, content strategy, and agile practices at Chicago Camps, edUI, 18F Speaker Series, Agile Government Leadership, IA Summit, and G2 Xchange podcasts.

Kristen & Natalie present:

Conscious Uncoupling — Innovative Ways to Separate User Habits from User Needs

When modernizing a legacy system, it’s easy to just recreate what exists—only a little better. This is an especially dangerous trap when the users equate what they need with what they already have. But what happens when your users don’t understand why they’re doing things a certain way? When their behavior is so ingrained that they can’t differentiate the what from the why?

When trying to understand current processes and uncover user needs for the new system, we encountered a wall of dogma separating our research team from the real problems users were trying to solve or the tasks they really needed to accomplish. It was nearly impossible for users to articulate why they were doing things — other than saying that was the way they had always done it. So how do you break habitual behaviors and get buy in from your users for changes that challenge their beliefs?

In this talk, we’ll share our experience uncovering user needs that are buried under layers of habit and complacencies. Participants will learn how to keep asking why until you get to the root of the need by using an outcomes-first approach to help users understand the difference between what they do (and why!) and what they truly need.

Lisa Dance

Lisa Dance
User Experience Designer, ServiceEase

Lisa D. Dance is a UX Designer/Founder at ServiceEase, a consultancy that helps businesses and non-profit organizations “be easy to do business with” by using user centered research and design. Her background includes re-establishing the user experience function for a Fortune 500 insurance company and contributing to their website winning over 17 national and international awards.

Lisa has a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Marketing, and an Interaction Design Specialization Certificate. As a strong advocate for the user experience design community, Lisa organizes the Ladies That UX-Richmond Chapter, plans events with Richmond Design Group, and created the UX Census (RVA) Survey in 2019 to provide a snapshot of the user experience landscape in the Richmond, VA area (RVA).

For more, keep up with Lisa at serviceease.net or on Twitter as @ServiceEase.

Stop Making Flawed Products

Flawed Products are products, services, and technologies developed without considering, including, and understanding the needs of the underserved consumers expected to buy and use them. Are you making flawed products?

Learn about the “3Q Do No Harm Framework,” a three question framework that empowers researchers, designers, developers, product teams, etc. to proactively identify, avoid, and mitigate harm before they release a product, service or technology.

Location

UX Camp: Home Edition will be 100% online and from where each of us are. And then, later, we’ll share on Vimeo so you can watch and learn again, watch what you’ve missed, or share with your internet pals.

Chicago Sponsors Camps

  • Rosenfeld Media
  • Simplecast
  • Lead Honestly
  • Columbia College Chciago

Code of Conduct

All attendees, speakers, sponsors and volunteers at our conference are required to agree with the following code of conduct. Organizers will enforce this code throughout the event. We are expecting cooperation from all participants to help ensuring a safe environment for everybody.

The Short Version
Full Version

Our conference is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, ethnicity, religion (or lack thereof), or technology choices. We do not tolerate harassment of conference participants in any form. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any conference venue, including talks, workshops, parties, Twitter and other online media. Conference participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the conference without a refund at the discretion of the conference organizers.