Leadership By Design 2017

About Chicago Camps

Learn design leadership from the experts at Leadership by Design 2017.

Leadership By Design 2018 is an online 2-day conference focused on all aspects of design leadership.

On Thursday & Friday, August 10th & 11th, we’re hosting a two-day, single-track conference featuring inspiring keynote speakers, accomplished design leaders, and experienced professionals from major brands and organizations.

This event was previously titled “Prototypes, Process & Play.”

Event Details
Speakers
Mike Davidson
Mike Davidson
Mike most recently spent three years as Vice President of Design for Twitter. Prior to joining Twitter, Mike was Vice President at NBCNews.com, where he managed social news products and technologies.
Eli Silva
Eli Silva
Senior Product Designer
Pivotal Labs
Eli Silva is a Sr. Product designer at Pivotal labs. Eli is best known as a diversity advocate with practical insights drawn from the design discipline. Unlike traditional approaches to org design that focus on charts and work distribution, Eli emphasizes studying the way people interact with an organization as a product.
Jared Spool
Jared Spool
Founder & Co-Founder
User Interface Engineering & Centre Center
Jared Spool is the founder of User Interface Engineering (UIE), the largest usability research organization of its kind in the world. If you’ve ever seen Jared speak about usability, you know that he’s probably the most effective and knowledgeable communicator on the subject today.
Tami Evnin
Tami Evnin
Lead Product Designer
NASDAQ
Tami Evnin is the Director of Portfolio Design Strategy at Nasdaq, where her team is changing the way a fintech leader builds products. She has established design best practices and helped scale the team from 3 to over 25 designers.
Sofia Millares
Sofia Millares
Creative Director of Product Design
NASDAQ
Sofia Millares is the Creative Director of Product Design at Nasdaq. For the past four years she has been overseeing the styling and global functionality for the entire product suite offering.
Suzanna Bierwirth
Suzanna Bierwirth
Chief Creative Officer
Consumer-first through-the-line thinker. Empowering Leader. Passionate Business Builder. Mother. Maker. Instigator.
Kathi Kaiser
Kathi Kaiser
Co-Founder & Partner
Centralis
Kathi Kaiser is co-founder and partner at Centralis, a Chicago-based UX consultancy. She leads a top-notch team in creating great user experiences for global clients, start-ups, and cultural institutions.
Dan Brown
Dan Brown
Co-Founder
EightShapes
Together with Nathan Curtis, Dan Brown founded EightShapes in 2006. Though specializing in information architecture, user research, and design discovery, Dan’s career spans most aspects of UX design.
Dr. Steve Julius
Dr. Steve Julius
Team Psychologist & Founder
Human Resource Consulting Group
Dr. Steve Julius is the founder and chief executive of HRCG, a Chicago based firm specializing in executive leadership, high performance teamwork, organizational effectiveness and strategic human capital solutions.
Carmen Medina
Carmen Medina
Owner
Medinanalytics
Carmen is an organizational heretic and all-purpose troublemaker whose only real expertise is asking stupid questions and noticing odd, new things that might amount to something…or maybe not.
Lisa Welchman
Lisa Welchman
Author, Managing Chaos: Digital Governance by Design
For the past two decades, the leaders of global 1000 companies, NGOs, and other organizations have turned to Lisa to analyze and solve their digital governance challenges.
Nicole Maynard
Nicole Maynard
Head of User Experience
Hyatt
Nicole Maynard is the Head of User Experience at Hyatt leading a team of researchers, interaction and visual designers, creating solutions that elevate Hyatt’s digital footprint and enhance the guest experience. She has taken the helm as president of the Chicago chapter of UXPA (User Experience Professionals Association).
Julia Keren-Detar
Julia Keren-Detar
UX Designer
Untame
Julia Keren-Detar is a game designer and developer based out of Chicago, IL. Currently she is the Creative Director for Untame, a studio shared by her and her husband.
Matthew Milan
Matthew Milan
CEO
Normative
Matthew is a complex systems specialist with a focus on software innovation. He has degrees in Ski Area Management, Geographic Information Systems and Environmental Planning, and has spent most of his career helping organizations make concrete decisions about the future through the integration of strategic design and technology prototyping.
Jay Newton-Small
Jay Newton-Small
Author, Co-Founder
MemoryWell
Jay Newton-Small is cofounder of MemoryWell, which tells the life stories of those suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia.
Scott Berkun
Scott Berkun
Author & Speaker
Scott Berkun is a bestselling author and popular speaker on creativity, philosophy, culture, business and many other subjects. He’s the author of seven books, including The Myths of Innovation, Confessions of a Public Speaker, and The Year Without Pants.
Donna Lichaw
Donna Lichaw
Executive Coach, Author, & Speaker
Independent
Donna Lichaw is an executive coach, speaker, author, and tin robot collector serving leaders in the product, design, and tech community at large.
Schedule

You work with ideas, big and small, all day long–isn’t it time you learn the deep patterns that explain your successes and failures? This short and fun presentation, based on a new book will share timeless patterns and entertaining insights that can help you be more creative and productive all at the same time. From finding creative confidence to getting better feedback, you’ll be entertained as you’re challenged to think differently about thinking. Bring your toughest questions and situations and get useful and entertaining advice during this heavily interactive session.

A critical part of leadership is the reduction of ambiguity for your team. Your job is to make it clear, so the team can work towards the goals you’ve set. The reality is that many of the goals you’re setting are make-or-break for the future of your organization. If you work in a field like design or innovation, you’re probably already sick of hearing the word “moonshot.” Maybe you’ve even been part of one, or more likely, you’ve unwittingly part of many. As a leader, moonshots are part of the job.

There’s just one problem with the “moonshot” approach: the real moonshot wasn’t a single giant leap forward. It was a series of incremental experiments designed to test the riskiest parts of going to the moon, as soon as possible. This approach put humans on the moon within a decade of Kennedy’s famous speech, and it’s the same approach that the best innovators like Elon Musk use to get rapid traction on the hardest and most complex problems of our times.

This session will demystify complex, challenging “moonshot” initiatives and give you a set of principles and practices that you can use to wrestle the riskiest innovation challenges to the ground. You’ve already got the tools: research, prototyping, planning and production. Now, let’s help you to connect them together with the right questions and perspectives, getting the traction you need make innovation work practical and successful.

When we engage in design thinking for our teams and projects, it’s easy to emphasize Design over the Thinking. Leaders know that we need to slow down to speed up; plan and think more to prevent rework and waste. Sometimes, we invest more in the work and the artifacts over finding the right ways to work together and create a shared understanding before moving toward a goal. Carmen Medina spent her entire career working with a diverse set of people and she had to find ways to create a shared space for collaboration–and she’ll show you how to focus on HOW teams work over WHAT the work is that’s being done.

All of this, regardless of whether or not you have a security clearance!

As an indie game studio, we had a shoestring budget for developing Mushroom 11, an award winning video game on desktop and mobile. This talk will explain how we used prototyping to make fast iterations on our design and how we used trade shows and other marketing events as ways to collect user data which informed our design process throughout development.

Neuroscience explains the delicate sparks that can either create happiness or make it elusive. Happiness has power–it makes us more productive, engaged and creative. When we’re feeling good, we are better able to create delightful experiences and have that positivity trickle into everything we touch. Let’s take a look at methods for cultivating happiness within ourselves so we can propagate it for others.

Getting others to listen to you is hard. Whether those people are your team members, peers across your organization, the c-suite, or a board up above, you need to inspire them and move them to action to be most effective at your job.

Storytelling is one of the most powerful ways you can get people to listen to you and to move them to action. But in a business context, the stories that you tell are only as effective as the stories that you build… and get others to build with you. We’ll look at how story drives some of the most successful product and service–driven organizations out there. Learn how story sparks systemic design thinking, collaboration, and innovation that enables you to more effectively build successful products and services that people get excited to work on… and use.

Executive office has proven the hardest glass ceiling to break. Less than 5% of Fortune 1000 CEOs are women, just 18% of America’s mayors, 12% of governors and, of course, zero presidents. There’s a huge body of research that shows, whether it’s a legislature, a corporate board, a Navy ship, or an appellate court, when women reach between 20-30% of the leadership at any given organization it’s a tipping point and they begin to change how things are done – for the better. Jay shows where we’re reaching that tipping point – all three branches of the government – and the areas where we not – such as Silicon Valley and Wall Street, and why it’s important for us to get to critical mass across the board.

Design is now finding it has a seat at the leadership table, but is it/are you viewed as a practitioner of an arcane science that is called upon to facilitate business processes? Or, are you also routinely called upon to contribute to the overall business strategy at the company–wide or departmental level? Building strong, domain capability will maintain your status as a design expert, but it won’t lead to your being trusted as someone who can help build the overall business strategy. That requires a complementary set of skills.

Talk to any CEO in organizations small and large and she will tell you about the critical role technology—and design–play in that business’ success. Ask that same CEO to describe how the design functions contribute to the day-to-day operation and it’s likely she will describe an enabling or support role. Dr. Steve Julius will describe how you can contribute to significant value creation as a strategic business partner, while maintaining and even enhancing your status as a design expert.

Discovery, the first part of the design process, is crucial for aligning teams and leading them to design success. A well-aligned team works toward the same goal, and brings out the best in each other because they all understand what their trying to achieve.

Discovery can take many forms: a multi-month endeavor to prepare for a complex business application, or a four-day “sprint” to align the team around a vision for a new product. Whatever the form, however, teams are prepping and priming themselves to do detailed design and development work.

Discovery is complicated, chaotic, and messy. In discovery, teams gather information about the problem and then explore different ways to tackle it. Through critical thinking, they refine their understanding of the problem and zero-in on a concrete plan for execution. Discovery requires participants to shift attitudes and perspectives almost constantly. Team members go from “tell me more about” to “how about this idea” in the blink of an eye.

To pull this off successfully, team members need to embrace a discovery mindset. This attitude emphasizes learning. It relies on team members maintaining an open mind, questioning everything, and above all not taking themselves too seriously.

In this session, we’ll look at why this attitude is important, how it affects your team’s approach to discovery, and ways you can cultivate this mindset in yourself and those you lead.

Back in 2001, I quit a perfectly good job and founded a UX consulting firm in a garage (a cliché, I know, but it’s true). Sixteen years later, Centralis is a thriving research and design firm with a small but mighty staff of UXers dedicated to both our craft and the company. Along the way we’ve learned that designing a company isn’t so different from designing a product. In this talk, I’ll share some of the lessons we’ve learned through prototyping, gathering feedback, and iterating on our organization.

Congrats–you finally got promoted! You’ve gotten your seat at the table and now you’re learning that it’s no longer just about the work. It’s also about the politics within your own organization and the clients. These tips are what I have learned over the years–from Junior Art Director to Chief Creative Officer–and none of them involve kissing ass or sucking up. It’s all about empathy.

What happens when you’re asked to step-up and lead the work of the design team or to manage your fellow designers for the first time? Most of us envision ourselves sketching ideas, designing solutions, or prototyping our days away, forever in our happy place. And we’re no different–we had no idea what to expect, beyond knowing what we saw that we thought was good or… not so good. We became new design managers and had to learn how to navigate our new responsibilities–to our boss and to our former peers–while trying to lead others to be successful as designers.

We faced a lot of challenges, and learned a lot about ourselves, our teams, and our boss. We’re going to share some tools and techniques that have helped us become better at leading our teams, and delivering to those who count on all of us. And we’re still working on becoming the best bosses in the world.

The lack of diversity in design organizations is a fact that we can design for. We can drive innovation and increase creativity, but we have to be honest about what’s holding us back. Eli Silva will outline ways to design cultures that support design thinking, organizational growth, and diversity in the workplace.

Great design is the result of hard work and cultures that foster empathy, creativity, listening, and honest conversations. These happen to be the groundwork for diversity, so why is diversity still such a challenge in technology and in design organizations in particular?

In this talk you will learn practical steps toward designing for diversity—including quick tips on how to audit your processes and practices today. Learn how to effectively consider minorities and underrepresented groups in your approach to hiring, everyday work, and leadership development. The result of diverse design organizations is products that increasingly reflect actual people, across the age, gender, and income spectrum. That’s something worth working for.

Every seasoned designer has fallen into the trap. They see the bad design in front of them. They can’t help but see how bad it is. And they want to redesign it. Show the world how it could be done. How it should be done.

Well-intentioned as the desire to rid the world of this bad design is, their approach often is a disaster. It pushes their allies away, accidentally giving off the air of superiority filled with the smells of arrogance and contempt.

An alternative is a well-designed process for creating your designs. The secret sauce in that well-designed process is a realization and inclusiveness of everyone on the team. It’s infused with an understanding of how people contribute to the design process, even when they aren’t trained in design skills. And it opens up opportunities to give everyone—not just your trained designers—the superpowers necessary to rid your products and services of bad design.

This talk will inspire you and your team to:

Realize the reason everyone thinks they are a designer is they are a designer, however unskilled
Learn that our design processes need to be designed, with intention and thoughtfulness
Focus on helping every contributing influencer of your designs become a consciously competent designer themselves

Event Details
Sponsors