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Chicago Camps

UX Camp

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Columbia College Film Row – Chicago

Photo: Anne Worner

Details

UX Camp is a full day of UX Goodness–we’ll leave few topics uncovered and you’ll learn current topics and improved upon standards in one of the hottest fields today!

If you’re just getting your start in UX and you’re hoping to learn more, or you’ve been in the field awhile and want to stay current, UX Camp is for you. A full day–3 full tracks–of UX talks, surrounded by impressive keynotes and all for a great price that includes your lunch.

Meet Our Awesome Sponsors

These fantastic sponsors are helping us bring this great event to you.

Keynotes

Gail Swanson

Gail Swanson
Director of Strategy, 18F

Finding a better way, a happier way to do something is in Gail’s DNA. She couldn’t stop if she wanted to. She guides teams to look deeper, and learn about the people they serve to create technology that helps.

Gail has applied her strategy focused approach to design in a wide range of industries; molding technology into usable systems for humans. She is currently serving her country as Director of Strategy at 18F.

For more, keep up with Gail at practicallyux.com or on Twitter as @practicallyUX.

Presenting Design Work to Decision Makers

The job of design includes collaborating with decision makers to accomplish business goals. Successful designers create shared understanding of complex ideas, in addition to doing high quality design work. Unfortunately, explaining the design rationale yields low levels of success. More effective communication strategies use a broader spectrum of tactics to start collaboration, get buy-in, and share knowledge.

Gail will explain how to create a presentation strategy, identify purposeful details, and handle difficult moments. Be more successful by learning to use work presentations as an opportunity to connect and make progress.

Jeff Eaton

Jeff Eaton
Digital Strategist, Lullabot

In 1983, Jeff Eaton used a Fisher-Price Printing Press to publish a neighborhood newspaper. Today, he helps large and small companies build and deploy their own publishing platforms. As a Digital Strategist with Lullabot Inc., he’s worked with clients including Sony/BMG Music, Fast Company and Inc. Magazine, World Wrestling Entertainment, Verizon Wireless, MSNBC, and more.

He’s a frequent writer and speaker at web and open source conferences; the host of the Insert Content Here content strategy podcast; co-author of the first edition of O’Reilly Media’s Using Drupal; and a shameless fan of well-curated ephemera collections. In a previous life he worked as a freelance writer and a copy editor, jobs that he recalls fondly while building editorial tools for today’s content teams.

For more, keep up with Jeff at angrylittletree.com or on Twitter as @eaton.

The Map Is Not The Territory: Collaborative Content Modeling for Digital Teams

The rise of content strategy has given digital teams a new way to tackle the challenges of publishing and product design. Concepts like a shared “content model” promise better communication and coordination… but somehow, most teams still manage to talk past each other.

Developers, designers, content editors, and stakeholders all care about different aspects of the content—and use different tools to capture their pieces of the puzzle. The good news is that these different views don’t have to conflict. By using each discipline’s perspectives to inform the others, we can gain a clearer and richer understanding of the content-avoiding common pitfalls, developing better lines of communication, and spotting often-overlooked opportunities for improvement.

Schedule

Registration & Breakfast
Gail Swanson
Presenting Design Work to Decision Makers Keynote
Morning Break
Rooms Blue (Main) Red Yellow
David Farkas
UX Field Research Basics
Margot Harrington
Design Tools for Political Justice
Garrett Polifka & Jayne Spottswood
Picking from the Grove, How We Discovered the Citrus Design System & Helped It Flourish
Break
Brad Nunnally
See What I Mean — The Hidden Language of the Body
Zeke Binion
Facilitating Google Design Sprints
Mike Gorgone
ImprovUX: Creating a Culture with Trust, Empathy & Collaboration
Lunch
Autumn Schultz
Askin’ Aint Easy
Lauren Johnson
The Benefits of Iterative Failure
Wilson Lee
Accessible UI for Color-Blind Users
Break
Lauren Lucchese
Real Talk: Designing Content That Builds Trust
Nikola Ranguelov
Designing for All the Rs (VR/AR/SR/MR/HR/etc.)
Daniel Orbach
The Journey to a Better Bar Graph
Afternoon Snack
Jeff Eaton
The Map Is Not The Territory: Collaborative Content Modeling for Digital Teams Keynote
Closing Ceremonies

Speakers

Autumn Schultz

Autumn Schultz
Senior Product Designer & Researcher, Trunk Club

Autumn is a Senior Product Designer and Researcher at Trunk Club in Chicago. She’s been involved in design and UX for several years and has worked for companies of all sizes, most notably Orbitz and Belly in addition to Trunk Club. In her free time, you will find her hanging out with friends in Bridgeport or mentoring aspiring UX designers at DESIGNATION, a UX Bootcamp located in Chicago.

For more, keep up with Autumn at autumnschultz.com or on Twitter as @AutumnSchultz.

Askin’ Aint Easy

Interviewing users is hard, but it doesn’t have to be. Autumn will be sharing tips on how to ask the right questions during user interviews so everyone can be a mini-user researcher!

Her talk will walk you through why user research is important to designers, the steps needed to kick off an interview and specific tactics keep in mind when interviewing. Following these steps, you should be able to gather authentic, actionable insights for your next project!

Brad Nunnally

Brad Nunnally
Experience Design Supervisor, 18F

Brad Nunnally is an Experience Design Supervisor at 18F and a co-author of “Designing The Conversation: Techniques for Successful Facilitation” for New Riders (Voices That Matter) and “UX Research: Practical Techniques for Designing Better Products” for O’Reilly Media. During his career, Brad has worked with clients spanning almost every major industry, mostly focusing on healthcare and financial services. For the past few years, Brad has enjoyed writing and speaking on topics that include user research, interactive prototyping, and how cognitive psychology applies to design. Recently, he has taken that passion to the federal government by joining 18F. He now spends his days contemplating how the government can be redesigned to be more people focused. When he is not thinking about user experience, he captures the world around him by practicing amateur photography and learning important life lessons from his children.

For more, keep up with Brad at onestraythought.com or on Twitter as @bnunnally.

See What I Mean — The Hidden Language of the Body

As designers, we are lucky enough to get to interact with many different types of people during the course of our work. We observe people using technology and proposed design solutions. While working on our projects, we collaborate directly with our team, clients, and stakeholders to bring a solution to life. All of this interaction exposes us to lots of body language. The language of the body offers up many hints and insights into what people are thinking and feeling. It’s been said that our bodies communicates what is really on our minds, and it’s important to know not only what others might be telling you but what you could be telling them.

It’s important for designers to have a fundamental understanding of body language and patterns they should look for when interacting with users or team members. There are key patterns that, when observed correctly, can tell you if someone is supportive of your idea, hiding their true feelings, or simply sitting back and daydreaming the meeting away.

Observing non-verbal communication cues is only one side of the coin though, the other side being your own body language. Inherently knowing the patterns and signs of the body opens your eyes to the messages you might be giving off. The ability to manage your own body language is something that can be learned and mastered, helping you become a better collaborator and communicator.

Participants will walk away from this session with a basic knowledge of how to read and respond to common non-verbal communication patterns and learn how to better manage their own non-verbal communication. They will be armed with additional resources to continue on their path of mastering the language of the body.

Daniel Orbach

Daniel Orbach
Senior Designer, Moment

Daniel brings an affinity for math and science to his process as designer. He takes a systemic, strategic approach to solving digital design problems, and the variety of projects he worked on before joining Moment – from warehouse optimization to homes of the future – illustrate the adaptability of his techniques. At Moment, he has led workshops in tech education and designed product and tools used in retail banking.

For more, keep up with Daniel at danielorbach.com or on Twitter as @orbachdl.

The Journey to a Better Bar Graph

How do you take something like a basic bar graph and make it beautiful without making it overly complex, or worse, misleading? Thinking about well-designed data visualization often conjures images of complex charts whose beauty lies in the dense texture of the data they bring to life. However, these visualizations are often lacking when it comes to being easily read and consumed by another human being.

In this talk, I’ll discuss how to meet in the middle by visualizing information in an intuitive, but also beautiful way. We’ll walk through a brief history of data visualization and look at various types of graphs and charts as well as ways of getting visualizations “past default.” Attendees will walk away with a better understanding of why graphs are the way they are, the parts you can keep and the parts you can change, and a framework that can be used right away to create more compelling visualizations in their everyday work.

David Farkas

David Farkas
Sr. UX Designer, EPAM

David is a User Experience Designer in Philadelphia, PA and co-author of UX Research: Practical Techniques for Designing Better Products. David started his career in-house, has worked in consultancies of all sizes, has had opportunities to craft the design process within an organization, and has also adopted and evolved existing paradigms. His experience includes a range of financial services systems, business systems, and e-commerce and cross-channel platforms.

For more, keep up with David at dfarkasdesign.com or on Twitter as @dafark8.

UX Field Research Basics

With the speed at which technology is changing, field research offers understanding into how products can impact the lives of your customers. Regardless if it’s your first or hundredth time, conducting field research is a daunting task. Planning and conducting field research is a juggling act between preparation, interview skills, and synthesis. In this talk, I’ll share some of the key principles involved in any researcher’s toolkit and explore lessons learned from the three main stages of conducting field studies:

Stage 1: Planning and prep — Gathering good research data starts with proper planning. This includes everything from writing interview questions and developing an interview guide to recruiting participants and determining logistics.

Stage 2: Out in the field — Research can drain you both physically and mentally. David introduce some tricks to keep your mind sharp, allowing you to give each session your focus.

Stage 3: Finding the patterns — The data resulting from field research grows quickly. David outline a few techniques for making the most out of limited time and managing mountains of information.

Garrett Polifka

Garrett Polifka
UX Lead, Paylocity

Garrett Polifka is a User Experience Lead with over a decade of creative industry experience, ranging from marketing to front-end development as well as application design. At Paylocity, Garrett is responsible for contributing to the organization’s design system, Citrus, while supporting the evolution of their industry-leading, cloud-based payroll, and human capital management software. Garrett prides himself on his desire to consume more information than an average 1984 computer could handle each day.

For more, keep up with Garrett at garrettpolifka.com or on Twitter as @garrettpolifka.

Jayne Spottswood

Jayne Spottswood
UX Architect, Paylocity

Jayne Spottswood is a UX Architect – or “UX Swiss Army Knife,” depending who you ask – at Paylocity, which develops industry-leading, cloud-based payroll and human capital management software solutions for medium-sized organizations. A few years after earning a communication degree in college, and working as a PR professional, Jayne could no longer resist her calling to create experiences that would help users get things done. To that end, she completed the HCI program at DePaul, and has since provided UX architecture, design, and research work for organizations ranging from small non-profits to large-scale enterprises. In Jayne’s free time, she serves an IxDA Chicago Local Leader, seeks out karaoke opportunities, and plays video games featuring anthropomorphic space rangers.

For more, keep up with Jayne on Twitter as @spotted_jay.

Garrett & Jayne present:

Picking from the Grove, How We Discovered the Citrus Design System & Helped It Flourish

We’ve all had that moment where it becomes apparent that various designers created the UI for your product. It also becomes glaring that reusable parts of the UI have divergent thinking contributing to inconsistencies in experience. There is a trend enterprise organizations are embracing to address these common problems, Design Systems.

Companies such as Salesforce and Google have embraced the notion with systems like Lighting and Material. At Paylocity, we’ve been fortunate to have found success creating the Citrus Design System alongside a company that grew to be a top twenty tech company that tripled its revenue. We’ll share some of our most critical findings; failures, challenges and defining moments over the last two years that helped shape our shift to a design mindset as an organization.

Lauren Johnson

Lauren Johnson
Lecturer, Columbia College Chicago

Lauren Johnson is the Coordinator of the Interaction Design major and the User Experience and Web Development minors in the Interactive Arts and Media (IAM) Department at Columbia College Chicago, and has been a faculty member in this program since 2006. She received her Masters in Education, Learning Design and Leadership, New Learning, from the University of Illinois, where she studied knowledge acquisition and educational theory through the lens of usability and technology. She teaches interface design, interaction theory, user experience and usability, and collaborative development. She also runs an interaction design company, Goodspark, which focuses on content management systems and usability analysis for small businesses, with a specialization in women-owned businesses and creative firms.

For more, keep up with Lauren at goodspark.com.

The Benefits of Iterative Failure

As design thinkers, we must focus on the process and not just the end goal. This presentation will address the benefits of creating environments that allow teams to take risks and fail; through this failure, they become more resilient, more realistic, and more accountable. In turn, their future work is more thoughtful and they have a greater ability to be nimble, collaborate, and pivot away from ineffective ideas.

Lauren Lucchese

Lauren Lucchese
UX Content Strategist, Capital One

Lauren is a UX content strategist, writer, and editor based in Chicago. She’s currently a UX Content Strategist at Capital One, where she uses words to design product experiences that feel like meaningful, personal conversations with customers.

Lauren loves to talk about things like honest UX, content-first UX design, and how to build meaningful relationships in the workplace and in the larger UX community. Most recently, she’s spoken at WebVisions Berlin and at the Women in Design and Tech Leadership Forum in Berlin and London.

She is also a bookworm and a fierce lover of all things pizza. Her long term life goals involve lots of travel to faraway places, hopefully with a good book within reach.

For more, keep up with Lauren on Twitter as @laurenlookayz.

Real Talk: Designing Content That Builds Trust

As content strategy continues to grow, it’s adapting to the needs of different organizations. While it used to be synonymous with writing web content, copywriting, and content marketing, that’s no longer the case. Now, we content strategists design messages to create meaningful, personal interactions with customers across across app interfaces, error messages, transactional communications, and more. Essentially, we are experience designers. It’s just that instead of visual elements, our main tool is words.

With this increased influence comes responsibility. As designers and content strategists, we need to constantly be thoughtful about how we’re positioning messaging in our experiences. We need to build trust with our customers, and much like trust between people, the only way we can do this effectively is by being upfront, authentic, and honest in our communication at all times. When we’re not, we end up failing our customers in a big way.

Lauren will talk about her experience as a content strategist on design and product teams at Capital One, and will showcase some of her go-to content strategy techniques and tools. She’ll introduce some questions and frameworks that can be iteratively applied throughout our design processes to maintain the integrity of our content.

Margot Harrington

Margot Harrington
Creative Director, Pitch Design Union & Adjunct Design Professor, DePaul University

Launched at the height of the 2008 recession, Pitch Design Union makes brands, websites, and publications for community-focused organizations, non-profits, small businesses, and contemporary art spaces. Clients include the Art Institute, the Chicago Design Museum, Studio Gang Architects, and Skillshare.com.

For more, keep up with Margot at pitchdesignunion.com or on Twitter as @pitchdesign.

Design Tools for Political Justice

How can UX and design professionals use technology to help fight injustice and abuse? This talk will go over existing tools for spotting fake news, browser tools and extensions to alert us to unsafe or threatening sites, as well as offer new recommendations to keep us one step ahead of oppression, and suggestions for sharing this knowledge with less technically inclined friends and family members.

Mike Gorgone

Mike Gorgone
UX Consultant, Cox Automotive Inc.

Currently I am working in Cox Automotive’s Enterprise Operations Center helping them with the redesign of their IT Scorecard website. My role is varied depending on the what the project needs. I’ve been doing more work in Interaction Design and Information Architecture but in the past I have done UI development as well prototyping (HTML, CSS and Javascript) that is eventually ported over to whatever the client’s end system is utilizing.

In 1999 I discovered Improv while living in Chicago, starting classes at Second City. Improv taught me how to be more aware of the moment, how to listen more instead of just responding and that a group working together in a non-judgmental and supportive manner can create much greater things than any of those individuals could on their own.

For more, keep up with Mike at improvux.com or on Twitter as @improvux.

ImprovUX: Creating a Culture with Trust, Empathy & Collaboration

With more Agile and Lean processes becoming commonplace, people are working in larger and more diverse teams. The teams can be comprised of UX professionals, subject matter experts, marketing professionals, technical experts, business stakeholders etc. How do you bring these people from varied silos together quickly so they can effectively solve problems together?

Answer: Improvisation

Improvisation and its basic tenets stress listening, agreement and non-judgment. Those tenets help foster an environment of trust, empathy and connection which all support better collaboration between people (as well as creativity, less fear of risk etc.). ImprovUX is action (you’ll be walking the walk!) as everyone will be participating in Improv exercises that focus on these skills. The audience gets to experience how it feels when you let yourself be present and open in a supportive and fun environment.

Nikola Ranguelov

Nikola Ranguelov
UX Lead & VR/AR Enthusiast

Nikola has been obsessed with technology since he was about five years old and his father brought home a computer from work. He quickly learned how to break it… and then, in turn, fix it (else he couldn’t play his games). He discovered that he experienced great joy in helping others figure out how to work their computers which ultimately led him to pursuing a career in the UX field.

Nikola’s been excited about touch-less, gesture, voice, and gaze-based interfaces since he first encountered them in science fiction. During his Master’s at DePaul HCI his capstone focused on the topic, over seven years ago. He backed the Oculus Rift on Kickstarter five years ago (in 2012) and has been anxiously anticipating the days when computing no longer consists of tapping and swiping on glass rectangles.

For more, keep up with Nikola at nikolaranguelov.com or on Twitter as @nickdotvr.

Designing for All the Rs (VR/AR/SR/MR/HR/etc.)

The world is rapidly changing, there are more and more companies taking notice of VR/AR (and often both) becoming anxious to experiment and have something of their own in that space. This talk will examine what’s available to consumers today, devices that are just around the corner and what impact there will be to best design practices when the user interface is viewed via a HMD (Head Mounted Display).

Why you should check out this talk – even if your company isn’t actively producing VR/AR experiences yet you will learn what the possibilities are and get a glimpse into things to come as well as different applications in various industries – Augmented and Virtual Reality revenue forecast is to hit $120 billion within three years (by 2020).

Wilson Lee

Wilson Lee
Developer, Broadway.com

Wilson is a developer at Broadway.com in NYC, working on web and Android development. He is very passionate about building clean and intuitive UI on web and mobile platforms, especially presenting complex data and information. Besides technology, he is a huge theatre fan (saw 44 Broadway shows in 2016) and an avid comic book reader. He loves bringing the sensitivity of performing and visual arts into his work. Most recently, he spoke at NYC Google Developer Group DevFest on building interactive UI with D3.js.

Accessible UI for Color-Blind Users

According to non-profit organization Color Blind Awareness, 8% of men and 0.5% of women in the world suffer from color blindness. It is crucial to develop websites that are accessible to color-blind users. I will first go over the accessibility guidelines on color and contrast from W3C as well as a series of dos and don’ts examples. I will then dive into a set of new non-color-based animations and transitions. These can be used to provide interaction feedback (active state, select state, etc) using SVG and D3.js. The attendees will walk away with useful tools and principles to build accessible UI for color-blind users.

Zeke Binion

Zeke Binion
Director of UX Design, Table XI

Zeke is a UX designer and developer based in Chicago. He is the Director of UX Design at Table XI, a custom software development company in Chicago that delivers business value through mobile applications, UX design and web development.

He is a passionate user experience generalist that lives at the intersection of design and technology. Using methods including Google Design Sprints, research, rapid-prototyping, and in-browser design he creates digital products that are deeply connected to people and technology. He has worked with a wide variety of clients from the Fortune 100 to Tech Startups.

He’s a tech nerd and a sports fan that tries really hard not to rant about either on Twitter.

For more, keep up with Zeke at ezekielbinion.com or on Twitter as @ebinion.

Facilitating Google Design Sprints

Making products that customers love is hard. So giving yourself 1 week to do it sounds crazy.

But many companies spend months or years building products only to learn that their customers don’t want it. Google’s Design Sprint solves this problem by focusing a cross-disciplinary team on a clearly defined problem, empowering them to generate many creative ideas, and ensuring they are building the right product by putting a prototype in front of customers in just 5 days.

This highly collaborative process breaks down silos and brings cross-functional project teams together to ensure all product perspectives are represented. But facilitating the room for a full week can be difficult. You’ll need to manage different personalities, encourage divergent thinking, build agreement, teach new skills and keep everyone moving on schedule.

Zeke will teach you techniques he’s learned by effectively facilitating Google Design Sprints for clients at Table XI.

Location

Columbia College Film Row

We are big fans of our venue and sponsor: Columbia College in Chicago. Columbia is a great place to learn and upgrade your design skills and we’re excited to partner with them!

Columbia College

About Columbia College

Columbia College Chicago is an institution of higher education specializing in arts and media disciplines, with nearly 12,000 students pursuing degrees within 120 undergraduate and graduate programs.

Check out Columbia College.

Where to Park?

There are several easy-access parking garages available in the surrounding blocks.

Where to Stay?

Coming from out of town? We recommend staying at The Congress Plaza Hotel on Michigan Avenue in the heart of Chicago.

Chicago Sponsors Camps

  • Rosenfeld Media
  • Simplecast
  • Columbia College Chciago
  • MOMENT Design

Code of Conduct

All delegates, speakers, sponsors and volunteers at any Chicago Camps, LLC event are required to agree with the following code of conduct. Organizers will enforce this code throughout the event.

The Short Version
Full Version

Be respectful of other people; respectfully ask people to stop if you are bothered; and if you can’t resolve an issue contact the organizers. If you are being a problem, it will be apparent and you’ll be asked to leave.